LSAT Writing Portion

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Offline Pheezer

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LSAT Writing Portion
« on: November 15, 2010, 04:29:06 PM »
Probably a stupid question, but if the wiring exercise isn't scored, can I just skip it?

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Offline Anne

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2010, 05:00:54 PM »
Probably a stupid question, but if the wiring exercise isn't scored, can I just skip it?

Definitely don't skip it. Even if it's not scored, it's still a part of your LSAC Score Report, and schools can see what you wrote (or if you didn't write anything at all). If you chose to skip it, it doesn't send the best message to schools. Every single admissions dean I've spoken to says a version of the same thing: "Even if the handwriting in the writing sample is so bad that I can't read a thing, it still looks better than a completely blank page." They all said that students that don't take the writing sample seriously, leave it blank, or just doodle do themselves a disservice and harm their admissions chances.
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Offline LSAT Eliminator

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2010, 05:24:05 PM »
I believe that LSAC reserves the right to not score your LSAT results if you fail to complete the Writing Sample. So, I'd write at least something :)

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Offline Pheezer

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2010, 06:03:30 PM »
Whoa, glad I asked! I probably would have just done it out of boredom, but I was thinking I could just turn the LSAT in and take off early. I'll write something for sure now.

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Offline LSAT Eliminator

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2010, 06:20:07 PM »
Whoa, glad I asked! I probably would have just done it out of boredom, but I was thinking I could just turn the LSAT in and take off early. I'll write something for sure now.

Yeah, it never hurts to ask! Better safe than sorry.

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Offline ChiTown

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2010, 06:28:08 PM »
Good to know. I hadn't contemplated skipping it, but I like knowing there are penalties if you do.

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Offline Ashley O

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2010, 06:32:20 PM »
Definitely don't skip it. Even if it's not scored, it's still a part of your LSAC Score Report, and schools can see what you wrote (or if you didn't write anything at all). If you chose to skip it, it doesn't send the best message to schools. Every single admissions dean I've spoken to says a version of the same thing: "Even if the handwriting in the writing sample is so bad that I can't read a thing, it still looks better than a completely blank page." They all said that students that don't take the writing sample seriously, leave it blank, or just doodle do themselves a disservice and harm their admissions chances.

The bold part suggests that one important thing about that sample is how neat your handwriting is. So, even if you write gibberish, make it look nice :)

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Offline SteelyDan

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2010, 06:32:39 PM »
My brain was totally fried by the time I got to the writing section, so I'm sure I didn't write anything terribly insightful, but since they don't score it, it doesn't matter. I just didn't want to leave it blank. Now I'm really glad i didn't just leave it.
"Forsan Et Haec Olim Meminisse Juvabit."

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Offline Anne

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2010, 06:35:04 PM »
Definitely don't skip it. Even if it's not scored, it's still a part of your LSAC Score Report, and schools can see what you wrote (or if you didn't write anything at all). If you chose to skip it, it doesn't send the best message to schools. Every single admissions dean I've spoken to says a version of the same thing: "Even if the handwriting in the writing sample is so bad that I can't read a thing, it still looks better than a completely blank page." They all said that students that don't take the writing sample seriously, leave it blank, or just doodle do themselves a disservice and harm their admissions chances.

The bold part suggests that one important thing about that sample is how neat your handwriting is. So, even if you write gibberish, make it look nice :)

Actually, a funny (sorta) story on that. The dean of admissions at USC Law (California) told me that she once saw a score report for a student who wrote, "I know you won't read this, so I'll just write this over and over" all the way down the page in very neat script, and she wasn't too amused (to be fair, she didn't seem to be very amused by anything). So, while neat script is good, writing something that at least pertains to the topic in neat script is best. :)
Director of Admissions Consulting for PowerScore LSAT Preparation. I can be reached at [email protected]

Check out my Law School Admissions Tip of the Week on the PowerScore LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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Offline Jeffort

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2010, 01:02:44 AM »
Definitely don't skip it. Even if it's not scored, it's still a part of your LSAC Score Report, and schools can see what you wrote (or if you didn't write anything at all). If you chose to skip it, it doesn't send the best message to schools. Every single admissions dean I've spoken to says a version of the same thing: "Even if the handwriting in the writing sample is so bad that I can't read a thing, it still looks better than a completely blank page." They all said that students that don't take the writing sample seriously, leave it blank, or just doodle do themselves a disservice and harm their admissions chances.

The bold part suggests that one important thing about that sample is how neat your handwriting is. So, even if you write gibberish, make it look nice :)

Actually, a funny (sorta) story on that. The dean of admissions at USC Law (California) told me that she once saw a score report for a student who wrote, "I know you won't read this, so I'll just write this over and over" all the way down the page in very neat script, and she wasn't too amused (to be fair, she didn't seem to be very amused by anything). So, while neat script is good, writing something that at least pertains to the topic in neat script is best. :)

That's pretty funny, pulling a Bart Simpson on a page in one of the first parts of your application the adcomms are going to look at.  D'oh!    




;bart;



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Offline Scooter14

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2010, 01:10:14 PM »
Here's a thread that was a few pages back with info on this topic... http://www.lsatdiscussion.com/index.php/topic,753.msg1522.html#msg1522

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Offline lawdog

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2010, 04:48:54 PM »
One more point: the writing sample portion of the test is administered at the end, and they generally won't let you leave until the time is up, so you have to be sitting there anyway...

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Offline LSAT Eliminator

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2010, 06:44:27 PM »
One more point: the writing sample portion of the test is administered at the end, and they generally won't let you leave until the time is up, so you have to be sitting there anyway...

Great point!

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Offline Dr. Troy

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Re: LSAT Writing Portion
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2010, 07:10:42 PM »
I saw an interview recently with the head of the admissions office at Yale Law, and she stressed that not only does she look at every applicant's essay, but given how competitive admissions has gotten, she often uses the quality of the essay to measure applicants relative to one another.

Of course, that's Yale, where 4.0/175+ is the rule rather than the exception, but still I think it emphasizes that every aspect of your application needs to be as solid as possible.

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DavidGoome

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