part time and full time

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Offline score172

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part time and full time
« on: March 07, 2012, 03:26:27 PM »
I am french and I dont really understand the concept of a part time program. Can someone explain me the difference between a part time and a full time program?

Also, I created a (french) company 2 years ago, that means I will work outside of law school. That's why I want to know if I can apply to a part time program.

Thank you :)

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Offline Jeffort

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2012, 07:20:54 AM »

Part time American law school programs typically take fours years to complete to earn a J.D.  The classes are typically held in the evening after normal business hours and on weekends.

Full time programs last three years to earn a J.D. and classes are held mainly during the day on weekdays during business hours. 

Part time law programs are mainly designed for people that also have to work and/or support a family, have other daily life obligations, etc.

Not all American ABA law schools offer part time programs, but many do.  You'll have to do some research to figure which ones do and that are in an area you would want to live for at least four years. 

I'm assuming your French company is something you can manage remotely from wherever, like an online thing or something, because if you are tied to having to live in a particular area to run your company, your law school options will shrink considerably, especially since not all schools offer part time programs.  Living close to the school you attend is really important in order to be able to make it to classes, have time to study and  ;juggle; everything else you have going in your life that you need to deal with.
 


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Offline Anne

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2012, 09:09:44 AM »
Jeffort gave you a good basic rundown of the differences between part-time and full-time programs. Check out this blog post for more information: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/should-i-choose-a-part-time-law-school-program/, and this link: http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/gradschool/law/parttime.html will give you a listing of all part-time programs in the U.S., broken down by state.

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Offline score172

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2012, 10:24:07 AM »
Thank you Anne and Jeffort for your answer :)

The problem is in case of a transfer to a full time program. Since a part time program is in 4 years, the transfer to a full time program seem impossible.

Do you know, by any chance, any part time law programs that can be completed in 3 years?




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Offline Anne

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2012, 09:44:26 AM »
Many students in part-time programs transfer to the full-time programs at their same institution without a problem. It is not impossible; it happens every year. It's harder to transfer from a part-time program at one institution to a full-time program at another, but it can still be done.

If you're looking for a three-year law program, then you're looking at full-time. There are no part-time three-year programs--three years is how long it takes to complete a full-time JD.
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Offline score172

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2012, 11:23:43 AM »
Many students in part-time programs transfer to the full-time programs at their same institution without a problem. It is not impossible; it happens every year.

Does it mean I can study in a part time program one year, and then transfer to the full time program and finish my studies in 3 years?

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Offline Jeffort

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2012, 03:15:48 PM »
Many students in part-time programs transfer to the full-time programs at their same institution without a problem. It is not impossible; it happens every year.

Does it mean I can study in a part time program one year, and then transfer to the full time program and finish my studies in 3 years?

Probably not unless you take a larger than regular full load of classes second and third year once into a full time program, which would be hard to do and kind of insane if you are working and trying to run a business at the same time.  By definition, if you are a part time student for one year you will be taking fewer classes and earning less credits than students in full time programs that year.

However, several law schools have introduced accelerated programs recently.  I do not have a list of them and haven't thoroughly researched the particular details yet.  It is a new experimental thing a few schools are toying around with, but from what I've read it does not appear to be with Tier one schools. But again, I'm not sure since it is a new phenomena and so far I've only read a few articles that mentioned it.  

Maybe Anne has more information readily available about these programs since she specializes in admission counseling/consulting and keeps her finger on the pulse of things like this more than myself.  

Bottom line is that the ABA requires each student to earn a certain minimum number of class credit units to be awarded a J.D. by an accredited law school.  Part time means less class credit units earned per semester that will have to be earned later.  Without a time machine or a clone of yourself that can take classes while you work, try to get some sleep and maybe have a life and vice versa so you can be in two places at the same time (which would be pretty cool, there is a funny movie about that), you are looking at three years to complete a full time program or four years to complete a part-time program.  


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Offline Anne

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2012, 10:25:58 AM »
Many students in part-time programs transfer to the full-time programs at their same institution without a problem. It is not impossible; it happens every year.

Does it mean I can study in a part time program one year, and then transfer to the full time program and finish my studies in 3 years?

Actually, yes, it does. At Georgetown and Fordham, the two law schools I was specifically thinking about, you would request the transfer after your first year in the PT program, and typically would take summer courses your 1L summer (and sometimes your 2L summer) to catch up and finish in three years. If you're interested in doing something like this, I would suggest that you start by researching which schools you'd like to do your PT work in, and then call them to see exactly what their FT transfer requirements and specifications are.

Regarding the accelerated programs Jeffort talked about: To the best of my knowledge, there are only four law schools in the U.S. that currently offer accelerated JDs (i.e., JDs that can be obtained in two years of full-time study instead of three): Washburn (in Kansas), Dayton (in Ohio), Southwestern (in California), and Northwestern (in Illinois). Northwestern is the only Tier 1 school in that list, and the program is fairly new (they're all fairly new, actually).
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Offline score172

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2012, 12:57:41 PM »
Thank you.

Are Fordham and GeorgeTown the only concerned law schools?

Do you know if these accelerated programs (especially Southwestern) are harder to get than a regular program? Especially for someone that is not a native english speaker.

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Offline Anne

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2012, 10:16:08 AM »
Are Fordham and GeorgeTown the only concerned law schools?

I'm not sure what you mean by "concerned." Fordham and Georgetown are not the only schools where you can transfer from their part-time program to their full-time program. I would imagine that most PT law programs allow you to transfer to their FT program, but I encourage you to contact the schools you're interested in directly and ask.

Do you know if these accelerated programs (especially Southwestern) are harder to get than a regular program? Especially for someone that is not a native english speaker.

I have very limited experience with these accelerated programs given how recent and few there are. I would imagine that the requirements are slightly more elevated and that an interview may be involved, given that the program will be much more rigorous than a 3-year traditional JD, and schools will want to make sure that students in these programs can handle it.

Here are the websites for each program:

Southwestern: http://www.swlaw.edu/academics/jd/scale
Northwestern: http://www.law.northwestern.edu/academics/ajd/
Washburn: http://washburnlaw.edu/admissions/fasttrack/index.php
Dayton: http://www.udayton.edu/law/#4

It looks like at least two programs, Southwestern and Northwestern, require interviews, and Northwestern requires post-graduate work experience as well. I encourage you to visit the websites for each program and contact the schools directly with questions--they're be able to give you the most accurate information.
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Offline score172

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2012, 12:06:12 AM »
Are Fordham and GeorgeTown the only concerned law schools?

I'm not sure what you mean by "concerned." Fordham and Georgetown are not the only schools where you can transfer from their part-time program to their full-time program. I would imagine that most PT law programs allow you to transfer to their FT program, but I encourage you to contact the schools you're interested in directly and ask.



I meant schools that have special summer courses. To be honest, I fear to be stuck into a part time after the first year. I really want to be sure the transfer to the full time is possible. Do you know for example, if the admission office will ask for a new LSAT to met the full time requirements? Also, do you know if a transfer between different part time program (I mean from different universities) is possible?


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Offline Anne

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2012, 09:53:45 AM »
Are Fordham and GeorgeTown the only concerned law schools?

I'm not sure what you mean by "concerned." Fordham and Georgetown are not the only schools where you can transfer from their part-time program to their full-time program. I would imagine that most PT law programs allow you to transfer to their FT program, but I encourage you to contact the schools you're interested in directly and ask.


I meant schools that have special summer courses. To be honest, I fear to be stuck into a part time after the first year. I really want to be sure the transfer to the full time is possible. Do you know for example, if the admission office will ask for a new LSAT to met the full time requirements? Also, do you know if a transfer between different part time program (I mean from different universities) is possible?


Again, not really sure what you mean by "special summer courses." Do you mean summer school? All schools have summer school.

Being unable to transfer out of a part-time program and into a full-time program is always a possibility, so you need to be prepared for that and not apply to a PT program if that's not something you're willing to consider.

Schools will not ask for a new LSAT score if you're transferring between PT and FT programs. At that point, what matters are your 1L grades; your LSAT is no longer relevant. That's the case for any post-1L transfer, whether it's from school to school, or from PT to FT.

I really don't know if transfer from one PT program to another is possible. I would imagine it's certainly within the realm of the possible, but I have no experience with this whatsoever. Again, this might be something where you calling/contacting the schools whose programs you're considering and asking that very question is the best way to get the information you're looking for.
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Offline score172

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2012, 01:18:08 PM »
Are Fordham and GeorgeTown the only concerned law schools?

I'm not sure what you mean by "concerned." Fordham and Georgetown are not the only schools where you can transfer from their part-time program to their full-time program. I would imagine that most PT law programs allow you to transfer to their FT program, but I encourage you to contact the schools you're interested in directly and ask.


I meant schools that have special summer courses. To be honest, I fear to be stuck into a part time after the first year. I really want to be sure the transfer to the full time is possible. Do you know for example, if the admission office will ask for a new LSAT to met the full time requirements? Also, do you know if a transfer between different part time program (I mean from different universities) is possible?


Again, not really sure what you mean by "special summer courses." Do you mean summer school? All schools have summer school.

Being unable to transfer out of a part-time program and into a full-time program is always a possibility, so you need to be prepared for that and not apply to a PT program if that's not something you're willing to consider.

Schools will not ask for a new LSAT score if you're transferring between PT and FT programs. At that point, what matters are your 1L grades; your LSAT is no longer relevant. That's the case for any post-1L transfer, whether it's from school to school, or from PT to FT.

I really don't know if transfer from one PT program to another is possible. I would imagine it's certainly within the realm of the possible, but I have no experience with this whatsoever. Again, this might be something where you calling/contacting the schools whose programs you're considering and asking that very question is the best way to get the information you're looking for.

Thank you. I contacted the law schools and it seems possible. It also seems like you have to take summer courses for 3 years to catch up the full time program.

Do you know if a transfer after 1L (as a 2L) is possible? If yes, is it difficult to get?

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Offline score172

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2012, 08:39:29 PM »
UP

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Offline Jeffort

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Re: part time and full time
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2012, 06:00:36 PM »
Are Fordham and GeorgeTown the only concerned law schools?

I'm not sure what you mean by "concerned." Fordham and Georgetown are not the only schools where you can transfer from their part-time program to their full-time program. I would imagine that most PT law programs allow you to transfer to their FT program, but I encourage you to contact the schools you're interested in directly and ask.


I meant schools that have special summer courses. To be honest, I fear to be stuck into a part time after the first year. I really want to be sure the transfer to the full time is possible. Do you know for example, if the admission office will ask for a new LSAT to met the full time requirements? Also, do you know if a transfer between different part time program (I mean from different universities) is possible?


Again, not really sure what you mean by "special summer courses." Do you mean summer school? All schools have summer school.

Being unable to transfer out of a part-time program and into a full-time program is always a possibility, so you need to be prepared for that and not apply to a PT program if that's not something you're willing to consider.

Schools will not ask for a new LSAT score if you're transferring between PT and FT programs. At that point, what matters are your 1L grades; your LSAT is no longer relevant. That's the case for any post-1L transfer, whether it's from school to school, or from PT to FT.

I really don't know if transfer from one PT program to another is possible. I would imagine it's certainly within the realm of the possible, but I have no experience with this whatsoever. Again, this might be something where you calling/contacting the schools whose programs you're considering and asking that very question is the best way to get the information you're looking for.

Thank you. I contacted the law schools and it seems possible. It also seems like you have to take summer courses for 3 years to catch up the full time program.

Do you know if a transfer after 1L (as a 2L) is possible? If yes, is it difficult to get?

Transferring from one school to a higher ranked law school for 2L is difficult.  In order to succeed or at least have a chance, you need to have top notch grades (top or close to top of your class) from 1L.  It's all about your 1L performance.

I don't mean to be rude, but what exactly are your law school plans and goals?  Your questions and ideas have been all over the map.  First things first, prep for the LSAT, get good at it and achieve a high score, then you will have many options.  In the meantime, figure out whether you want to do full time or part time and where you would like to live and go to school for at least three years.  Once you have a good LSAT score, apply to your preferred schools and see what happens. The process will go much more smoothly with less uncertainty to simply get into a good full time or part time program in a place you would be happy to live and cut out all this transferring stuff.  

Pick an area and schools and let the school choose you based on the merits of your application. Then enroll, move there, plant some roots, make friends with classmates and people in the area and plan on staying for several years.  

It seems that you are making a complex and difficult process even more complex and difficult based on the various FT/PT transfer etc. options you are exploring.

Get in somewhere good, enroll, show up, study, do well on exams to achieve good grades, graduate, then prep for the bar exam in whatever state you want to practice in.