Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?

  • 60 Replies
  • 29397 Views
*

Offline tordelay8

  • Newbie
  • *
  • 23
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2010, 10:37:17 AM »
I have a ? - Is it better to apply with a paper application or an online one? I see schools that have the option for both.

*

Offline Amby

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 74
  • All life is ambient.
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2010, 10:51:24 AM »
Paper. The web is a dead medium and everyone loves more paper in their lives. I mean, who needs trees anyway?

*

Offline Anne

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 639
  • All hail!
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2010, 12:32:03 PM »
I have a ? - Is it better to apply with a paper application or an online one? I see schools that have the option for both.

When in doubt, always read the school website carefully. Most schools will say something like "Electronic application preferred." That's their way of telling you that paper applications are a pain and they don't want to have to deal with them, so they would really love it if you could just do the electronic one. Some schools won't tell you, and it's up to you to decide. If I were you, I would always choose the electronic application, for two reasons:

1. You aren't spending money on paper, envelopes, stamps, and delivery confirmations.
2. You reduce the chance of human error (because no one will have to transfer your info from a paper app into a spreadsheet at the Admissions Office).

Make sure to check LSDAS carefully--if the school REQUIRES you to use LSDAS to submit your application, don't submit it any other way. That's a huge no-no, since it basically sends a huge red flag to admissions officers: "Hey, look at me! I can't follow simple directions!" Or, even worse, "Hey, look at me! I read your request and decided to completely disregard it!" Neither one is good.

The paper app won't have different content from the electronic one--only the method of transmission will be different. There is no real CONTENT advantage to doing one over the other--however, one very real advantage to doing the e-apps or LSDAS is that you can track which apps have been sent and, in many cases, track what stage of the process your app is in. That can be a huge advantage to many anxious students who just need confirmation that their app has been received and read.

If you have questions about what LSDAS is and how it works, take a look at this thread: http://www.lsatdiscussion.com/index.php/topic,729.0.html. It discusses LSDAS and some of its intricacies.
Director of Admissions Consulting for PowerScore LSAT Preparation. I can be reached at [email protected]

Check out my Law School Admissions Tip of the Week on the PowerScore LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

*

Offline UnfGirl

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 53
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2010, 11:34:05 PM »
So, a little confused regarding transcripts. If they are sent in with the application, do the law schools ever get the chance to see my senior year grades?

*

Offline Anne

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 639
  • All hail!
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2010, 11:40:50 AM »
So, a little confused regarding transcripts. If they are sent in with the application, do the law schools ever get the chance to see my senior year grades?

Some schools will give you a conditional acceptance pending your senior year grades. Other schools will give you an unconditional acceptance and just request that you submit your grades once they are available. It depends on the school (so you should really check with each school to see what their particular policy is). However, a good rule of thumb (aside from making sure that you still keep your grades up during your senior year regardless of your law school acceptance), is to submit updated transcripts to LSDAS as they become available. You can submit your fall semester grades in January once they are available, and then (if the school requires it and/or you are on the waiting list and/or you haven't heard from your schools yet) your spring semester grades once they are available in June.

Keeping your application fresh can go a long way, particularly if you are waitlisted or you haven't heard back yet. The more recent the info on your app, the more schools will appreciate it.
Director of Admissions Consulting for PowerScore LSAT Preparation. I can be reached at [email protected]

Check out my Law School Admissions Tip of the Week on the PowerScore LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

*

Offline tordelay8

  • Newbie
  • *
  • 23
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2010, 08:45:17 AM »
I have a ? - Is it better to apply with a paper application or an online one? I see schools that have the option for both.

When in doubt, always read the school website carefully. Most schools will say something like "Electronic application preferred." That's their way of telling you that paper applications are a pain and they don't want to have to deal with them, so they would really love it if you could just do the electronic one. Some schools won't tell you, and it's up to you to decide. If I were you, I would always choose the electronic application, for two reasons:

1. You aren't spending money on paper, envelopes, stamps, and delivery confirmations.
2. You reduce the chance of human error (because no one will have to transfer your info from a paper app into a spreadsheet at the Admissions Office).

Make sure to check LSDAS carefully--if the school REQUIRES you to use LSDAS to submit your application, don't submit it any other way. That's a huge no-no, since it basically sends a huge red flag to admissions officers: "Hey, look at me! I can't follow simple directions!" Or, even worse, "Hey, look at me! I read your request and decided to completely disregard it!" Neither one is good.

The paper app won't have different content from the electronic one--only the method of transmission will be different. There is no real CONTENT advantage to doing one over the other--however, one very real advantage to doing the e-apps or LSDAS is that you can track which apps have been sent and, in many cases, track what stage of the process your app is in. That can be a huge advantage to many anxious students who just need confirmation that their app has been received and read.

If you have questions about what LSDAS is and how it works, take a look at this thread: http://www.lsatdiscussion.com/index.php/topic,729.0.html. It discusses LSDAS and some of its intricacies.

k thx!

*

Offline ninjasrule

  • Newbie
  • *
  • 10
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2010, 01:58:03 PM »
What professors should I ask for my recommendations? I'm lucky to go to a school where professors know students well, but I can't decide between these two things:

Group A:
Professors I've only known for a semester, but that I've gotten to known really well and know how I think in class, what I contribute

Group B:
Professors I've known on-and-off through classes since freshman year, but might know the same as Group A just through sheer time exposure.

 ???

*

Offline LawSchoolGuy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 182
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2010, 03:15:20 PM »
What professors should I ask for my recommendations? I'm lucky to go to a school where professors know students well, but I can't decide between these two things:

Group A:
Professors I've only known for a semester, but that I've gotten to known really well and know how I think in class, what I contribute

Group B:
Professors I've known on-and-off through classes since freshman year, but might know the same as Group A just through sheer time exposure.

 ???


If the guy in group B really knows you just as much as the guy in group A, but the guy in group A (wow, this is starting to sound like logical reasoning) has experiences and interactions with you that are more recent, I would go with the group A guy. They'll be apt to be more enthusiastic about you and have more stuff to say, just because they'll actually remember more.

*

Offline Anne

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 639
  • All hail!
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2010, 03:24:17 PM »
What professors should I ask for my recommendations? I'm lucky to go to a school where professors know students well, but I can't decide between these two things:

Group A:
Professors I've only known for a semester, but that I've gotten to known really well and know how I think in class, what I contribute

Group B:
Professors I've known on-and-off through classes since freshman year, but might know the same as Group A just through sheer time exposure.

 ???


If the guy in group B really knows you just as much as the guy in group A, but the guy in group A (wow, this is starting to sound like logical reasoning) has experiences and interactions with you that are more recent, I would go with the group A guy. They'll be apt to be more enthusiastic about you and have more stuff to say, just because they'll actually remember more.

I would tend to agree with LawSchoolGuy, but I would also recommend that you actually talk to both of your profs about potentially writing you a letter, and ask them flat out if they feel they could write an informed, detailed recommendation about you. Professor B might remember more about you than you know, and might be very willing to write you a detailed, positive rec.

Regardless of whom you choose, I would definitely recommend that you provide both camps with a résumé and a copy of a paper you did in class, in addition to spending some time talking to them about what your law school goals and career aspirations are. This will give both profs the chance to write relevant and well-informed letters.
Director of Admissions Consulting for PowerScore LSAT Preparation. I can be reached at [email protected]

Check out my Law School Admissions Tip of the Week on the PowerScore LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

*

Offline Jeffort

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 476
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2010, 05:56:43 PM »
What professors should I ask for my recommendations? I'm lucky to go to a school where professors know students well, but I can't decide between these two things:

Group A:
Professors I've only known for a semester, but that I've gotten to known really well and know how I think in class, what I contribute

Group B:
Professors I've known on-and-off through classes since freshman year, but might know the same as Group A just through sheer time exposure.

 ???


If the guy in group B really knows you just as much as the guy in group A, but the guy in group A (wow, this is starting to sound like logical reasoning) has experiences and interactions with you that are more recent, I would go with the group A guy. They'll be apt to be more enthusiastic about you and have more stuff to say, just because they'll actually remember more.

I would tend to agree with LawSchoolGuy, but I would also recommend that you actually talk to both of your profs about potentially writing you a letter, and ask them flat out if they feel they could write an informed, detailed recommendation about you. Professor B might remember more about you than you know, and might be very willing to write you a detailed, positive rec.

Regardless of whom you choose, I would definitely recommend that you provide both camps with a résumé and a copy of a paper you did in class, in addition to spending some time talking to them about what your law school goals and career aspirations are. This will give both profs the chance to write relevant and well-informed letters.

Whether group A or B, the bold above is not only very important for deciding whom to have submit LOR's, it is also very helpful and important to generate a good detailed LOR.  Spend time talking to the professor in detail about things.  Not just about wanting a letter of req either.  Talk to them about whatever their fields of academic interest are, about topics in the class you took from the proff that you found interesting (proffs love to talk about their fields of interest/specialization!), etc.

If possible, show up in person in their office during office hours well prepared and willing to stay for a bit talking about whatever in order to build rapport, refresh their memory about you, get them to like you and know you better, etc.

*

Offline ninjasrule

  • Newbie
  • *
  • 10
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #25 on: July 21, 2010, 12:27:48 AM »
Thanks everyone. I will talk to my professors and see what happens.

*

Offline Anne

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 639
  • All hail!
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2010, 11:42:14 AM »
Thanks everyone. I will talk to my professors and see what happens.

Let us know if you have any questions or need any further guidance; we're all glad to help! :)
Director of Admissions Consulting for PowerScore LSAT Preparation. I can be reached at [email protected]

Check out my Law School Admissions Tip of the Week on the PowerScore LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

*

Offline ninjasrule

  • Newbie
  • *
  • 10
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2010, 06:14:50 PM »
Hey, I actually have another question.

I looked at some of the threads about researching different schools, but I guess I didn't read too carefully for them to be helpful. When I'm "researching" schools, what should I be looking for? I really have no idea what kinds of criteria to use (except for the obvious ones like scholarship money, location, etc.)

*

Offline Anne

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 639
  • All hail!
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2010, 10:54:45 AM »
Hey, I actually have another question.

I looked at some of the threads about researching different schools, but I guess I didn't read too carefully for them to be helpful. When I'm "researching" schools, what should I be looking for? I really have no idea what kinds of criteria to use (except for the obvious ones like scholarship money, location, etc.)

The "obvious ones" (and, believe me, they're not so obvious to many people--far too many students don't take the time to consider "obvious" things like location) are the ones you should definitely be focusing on: Location, cost, potential scholarship money, strength of faculty, placement in rankings (yes, you should still consider rankings, just not as the end-all-be-all), religious affiliation (this is important both for those that are religious as well as those that are not), incoming class size, 1L section size, etc.

There's no magic to "researching" schools; at the end of the day, what you're doing is looking for schools that fit what YOU'RE looking for. Take a moment to consider what kind of school would make YOU happy, and then look for those specific traits as you research schools.
Director of Admissions Consulting for PowerScore LSAT Preparation. I can be reached at [email protected]

Check out my Law School Admissions Tip of the Week on the PowerScore LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

*

Offline SteelyDan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 149
Re: Do you have questions about the law school admissions process?
« Reply #29 on: July 28, 2010, 10:46:32 AM »
What I'm doing is focusing on the ranking of the school and then also the location. I want to go to a decent school, but the most important thing to me is the location. I want to go to a school somewhere in the South. Are there other things I should be looking at?
"Forsan Et Haec Olim Meminisse Juvabit."